Tuesday, April 28, 2009

The Return of James Fassett And His NMican Paleocene Dinos

NEW GEOCHRONOLOGIC AND STRATIGRAPHIC EVIDENCE CONFIRMS THE PALEOCENE AGE OF THE DINOSAUR-BEARING OJO ALAMO SANDSTONE AND ANIMAS FORMATION IN THE SAN JUAN BASIN, NEW MEXICO AND COLORADO

James E. Fassett

ABSTRACT

Dinosaur fossils are present in the Paleocene Ojo Alamo Sandstone and Animas Formation in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and Colorado. Evidence for the Paleocene age of the Ojo Alamo Sandstone includes palynologic and paleomagnetic data. Palynologic data indicate that the entire Ojo Alamo Sandstone, including the lower dinosaur-bearing part, is Paleocene in age. All of the palynomorph-productive rock samples collected from the Ojo Alamo Sandstone at multiple localities lacked Cretaceous index palynomorphs (except for rare, reworked specimens) and produced Paleocene index palynomorphs. Paleocene palynomorphs have been identified stratigraphically below dinosaur fossils at two separate localities in the Ojo Alamo Sandstone in the central and southern parts of the basin. The Animas Formation in the Colorado part of the basin also contains dinosaur fossils, and its Paleocene age has been established based on fossil leaves and palynology.

Magnetostratigraphy provides independent evidence for the Paleocene age of the Ojo Alamo Sandstone and its dinosaur-bearing beds. Normal-polarity magnetochron C29n (early Paleocene) has been identified in the Ojo Alamo Sandstone at six localities in the southern part of the San Juan Basin.

An assemblage of 34 skeletal elements from a single hadrosaur, found in the Ojo Alamo Sandstone in the southern San Juan Basin, provided conclusive evidence that this assemblage could not have been reworked from underlying Cretaceous strata. In addition, geochemical studies of 15 vertebrate bones from the Paleocene Ojo Alamo Sandstone and 15 bone samples from the underlying Kirtland Formation of Late Cretaceous (Campanian) age show that each sample suite contained distinctly different abundances of uranium and rare-earth elements, indicating that the bones were mineralized in place soon after burial, and that none of the Paleocene dinosaur bones analyzed had been reworked.

James E. Fassett. U. S. Geological Survey, Emeritus, 552 Los Nidos Drive, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

KEY WORDS: Paleocene dinosaurs; K-T interface, geochronology, palynology, paleomagnetism, vertebrate paleontology

PE Article Number: 12.1.3A
Copyright: U.S. Geological Survey, Public Domain April 2009
Submission: 13 December 2007. Acceptance: 28 January 2009


He's baaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaack! There's a link to the paper at post title (note: that's the std with this blog, btw)

Brian talked about Fassett's last paper in Laelaps version 1. There have been rebuttals in the past as well.

That said, it appears that Fassett is about the only one espousing Paleocene dinosaurs in New Mexico. I'd love to say he was right (I'm as much an sucker for the whole underdog thing as anyone), but this isn't looking that way. Read for yourselves and pass judgement.

Oh, press release here.

1 comment:

Zachary said...

Eh--you never know. I haven't read the paper yet. If the hadrosaur is sufficiently far into the Paleocene, I can see reworking being reconsidered. Like I said back on Laelaps v.1, I'm certain that we'll find Paleocene dinosaurs someday--they didn't all just collapse at the end of the Cretaceous.